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WordPress.com announces it’s first pay feature

Posted in Technology, WordPress.com Tips by engtech on August 04, 2006

WordPress.com is the best freely hosted blog solution. That’s why I use it. They’ve always been saying they’ll eventually offer pay features to make money. Today’s feature announcements (new minimal Sandbox Theme , private user-level access controlled blogs, custom CSS for a fee) revealed the first pay feature.

One of the main advantages to running a wordpress.org self-hosted blog versus a wordpress.com multi-user blog is the ability to customize your layout via themes and install plug-ins. WordPress.com offers a limited selection of 38 themes. The themes are very inconsistent. Each theme supports different features and has different bugs. In fact, the only thing themes have in common is that they all seem to have bugs.
I wonder if the ability to customize CSS for a fee will deprioritize fixing theme bugs even further? I trust the guys at WP, but I know that fixing theme problems would be the last thing on my list if people could get around it by using custom CSS.

The price is a reasonable $15/year. The average cost for having a custom WordPress blog hosted professionally elsewhere is around $7/month. I’m assuming that once you’ve paid it is good for all of the blogs hosted on your user account, but it may be by individual blog.

Update: it is per blog, not per user.

I hope once they’ve added other wordpress.com “products” they start offering bundles. There should always be a bundle with all the wordpress.com products that is similiar in cost to hosting elsewhere.

>> WordPress.com � Custom CSS

>> CSS Customization � WordPress.com Forums

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  1. […] >> WordPress.com announces it’s first pay feature […]

  2. //engtech gets new CSS duds « //engtech said, on November 25, 2006 at 3:40 am

    […] 4 months ago WordPress.com introduced their paid CSS upgrade feature. My first reaction was that I wanted to stay the hell away from it because I know I’d end up endlessly tweaking the site and never producing any content. So instead I focused my efforts into trying to improve the existing WordPress.com themes (and coming up with nifty stuff that is useful to any theme designer). The time I’ve spent debugging themes countered any argument against the CSS time sink. […]

  3. […] gets new CSS duds 4 months ago WordPress.com introduced their paid CSS upgrade feature. My first reaction was that I wanted to stay the hell away from it because I know I’d end up […]


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