// Internet Duct Tape

Best of Feeds – 23 links – programming, music, photography, psychology, rails

Posted in Best of Feeds by engtech on January 13, 2008

RSS feeds are like cookies (that are good enough for me). Best of Feeds is a weekly collection of the best stuff I saw on the Internet this week. They’re saved on delicious and stumbleupon and cross-posted to Twitter and Tumblr as they happen and then collected together on Saturdays. I don’t blog on the weekend so read these links instead.Subscribe to //engtech to see this every week (or get it by email).

Legend

  • saves – number of people who bookmarked on http://del.icio.us
  • inbound links – number of blogs who linked to it (max 100)
  • diggs – number of people who dugg on http://digg.com

This Week at Internet Duct Tape

This Week at IDT Labs

  • [WORDPRESS] Category Resizer v1.0
    • WordPress Category Resizer 2008/01/02 – v1.0 – BUGFIX: newer versions of WordPress.com broke this script – BUGFIX: will run on any WordPress install, not just WordPress.com – BUGFIX: now works when you have less than three categories – added automatic update check – Tested with WordPress.com…
  • [WORDPRESS] Comment Ninja v0.5
    • Comment Ninja v0.5 2008/01/02 – 0.5 don’t display comment ninja in mass-edit mode, since it doesn’t work on that mode wordpress.com added avatars to the comment display and they were being sent in emails on multi-author blogs it grays out the comments you can’t edit IDT Labs is a…

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Why Open Source Software Sucks – Software Simplicity Isn’t Simple

Posted in Programming and Software Development, Technology by engtech on December 06, 2007

Programming Tips

Aside: Hosted software would be something like Gmail, while installable software would be something like Outlook. WordPress.com is hosted software by Automattic, but it is also available at WordPress.org where you can download it and install it yourself where ever you want.

There are a few “internet rockstars” in programming circles, and most programmers who read blogs will have heard of Joel Spolsky (one of the few people who writes entertaining tech books) and 37signals (the guys who made Ruby on Rails and Basecamp). The guys at 37signals recently wrote a post about how they prefer creating web-based software that they host vs software that a user would have to download and install themselves because it is so much easier for the software developer. When you don’t have to release your software into the wild you have so many less things to worry about: different operating systems, memory performance, installation dependencies, hardware dependencies.

“You have to deal with endless operating environment variations that are out of your control. When something goes wrong it’s a lot harder to figure out why if you aren’t in control of the OS or the third party software or hardware that may be interfering with the install, upgrade, or general performance of your product. This is even more complicated with remote server installs when there may be different versions of Ruby, Rails, MYSQL, etc. at play.”

Joel looks at his stats and points out that if he didn’t provide installable software then he’d be out of business, because it accounts for 80% of his revenue compared to hosted software.  He also makes a great point that software that people are willing to buy is software that solves a gnarly problem, IE: it deals with complicated stuff. Any other kind of problem can be solved by free software because its uncomplicated enough that one guy in his mom’s basement can churn it out over a weekend.

“The one thing that so many of today’s cute startups have in common is that all they have is a simple little Ruby-on-Rails Ajax site that has no barriers to entry and doesn’t solve any gnarly problems. So many of these companies feel insubstantial and fluffy, because, out of necessity (the whole company is three kids and an iguana), they haven’t solved anything difficult yet. Until they do, they won’t be solving problems for people. People pay for solutions to their problems.”

But he then follows through with a great point that the gnarly problem that 37signals’ applications solve is the problem of design. 37signals might be building fluffy Ruby-on-Rails Ajax sites, but that’s beside the point of the problem they’re really solving: how to design a great looking user experience that makes people happy.

I think this draws a great parallel to what’s wrong with free software: it’s created to scratch a certain itch, and that’s usually all it does. Compelling user interface? Joy to use? Nope, it solves the original programmer’s problem and that’s about it. And before you get all uppity that I’m attacking open source software, let me clarify that I’m talking about the open source software I create.

The problem is two-fold: I have a natural tendency to over-complicate things and I have trouble sharing the customer’s pain (stepping away from the code, and seeing how a stranger would view the end result). Jeff “Metal” Atwood asks “When was the last time you even met a customer, much less tried to talk to them about a problem they’re having with your website or software?”

This hit me last week when I sat down with another engineer to show him an internal tool I was building for him. He started poking a usage case that confused him. It wasn’t in the spec, and it didn’t follow the way he thought of the flow. It was an artifact of the internal data structures I was using that I was exposing to the user. This happens too often. It’s the opposite of opinionated software [1]: pushing the decision making on to the user. [2]

Of course, writing open source software has its benefits because quite often there’s no barrier between you and the people who are using your software other than computer screens. You are your own quality assurance, and you are your own customer service. You have to explain to the users why they should install your software, you have to deal with the installation headaches your platform choice created, you have to explain any complexities with how to use it, and you have to help them when problems occur.

My open source software might suck, but its helping me explore the solution to a gnarly problem: how to solve problems in a way that is easy for other people to use.

Related Posts

Footnotes

1 – There’s an interested essay to be written comparing opinionated software to considerate software.

2 – This programming talk might bore you, but the problem of simplicity in design is cross-discipline and applies to any blogger.

Getting Started with Ruby on Rails – Week 3 – Testing

Posted in Ruby on Rails, Technology by engtech on December 05, 2007

Learning Ruby

I’ve fallen for the hype and started using Ruby on Rails for building database driven web applications. You can follow along with my weekly experience discovering gotchas with Ruby on Rails.

Previously: Getting Started With Ruby on Rails – Week 2

(I swear, back to your regularly scheduled non-rails content soon enough)

Gotcha #1 – after_initialized is after_instantiated

Yes, after_initialized is called more often than just when you call Model.new. Use if new_record? inside of it.

Gotcha #2 – button_to has it’s own class

You can’t pass :class parameters to the button_to helper because it creates it’s own :class=>”button_to”. Use :id instead.

Use console

script/console will give you an interactive console for playing with objects. Use it! It makes debugging tiny little gotchas with ruby syntax you might not be familiar with so much easier. Type reload! in the console to reload your models after any changes you’ve made. Type object.methods to see a list of everything an object responds to.

You can use many familiar console navigation keys like Up, Down to move between previous commands and Ctrl-A for start of line and Ctrl-E for end of line.

The Migration Shuffle

When you’re building a new migration on your development database always do the following:

rake db:migrate
rake db:migrate VERSION={current version - 1}
rake db:migrate

It’ll let you know that you’ve made an error in your down method right away, instead of weeks later when you’re trying to rebuild the database.

Little Bobby Tables

At some point your going to write a bad migration and screw up your development database, so rebuild it.

> mysql -u root -p
drop database proj_development; drop database proj_test;
create database proj_development; create database proj_test;
quit
> rake db:test:prepare
> rake db:migrate

bobby tables

http://xkcd.com/327/

Data Migrations

If you’re building data migrations, always uses .save! so that it will fail on a validation error and you may want to litter your migration with puts statements to jump to which object is failing validation. There’s probably a better way of doing this using fixtures, or using –trace to find which migration failed.

Or hell, don’t use a data migration for bulky legacy data.

There’s Something About Tests

I really like how simple it is to write fairly complicated tests. One thing I didn’t like was how many tests it is possible to write. The examples from Agile Web Development with Rails showed them creating a lot of tests for the validates_* helpers. Unfortunately, you don’t need to create tests that duplicate those helpers because they are bulletproof. You do however need tests to prove that you used them correctly.

Cut-and-paste errors do happen, and double checking my validations did reveal at least one case where I thought I was validating a field but I wasn’t. Not to mention that if you’re using a regular expression filter to validate the format of a field you might forget to put start and end delimiters on it. Even testing something simple like all values are in the list is useful because you might have another validation that invalidates one of the values from your list.

Ruby is Dynamic

One thing I can’t stress enough is how much you NEED unit tests. Ruby is a dynamic language, and as such there isn’t a great and easy way to find out if the code will blow up without running it. If you run it by hand you won’t find all the interesting scenarios for the simple reason that you won’t be rechecking features you implemented last week that exploded because of a change you made this morning. You need a regressable test suite.

And there’s nothing like writing a test to make you realize how much more complicated you’ve made things than they need to be.

How to Run Tests

Run an individual test

ruby test/unit/testname.rb

Run multiple tests:

rake test # run all test
rake test:unit # run unit tests
etc

They can all be done inside of emacs by using the Tests drop down menu in rails-mode. This is the preferred method because you can click on errors and go directly to that file.

rails-mode also lets you use C-c C-c . to run the current test file. This allows you to rapidly iterate through test development.

Running Tests – Verbose Assertions

Here’s another tip that I didn’t realize at first: you can supply a message argument to your assertions that will display when it fails. This is essential if your using loops in your tests, IE: looping over an array of invalid field values, because the line number isn’t enough information to find out why the test failed.

Debugging a Test – Breakpoint

You can use the breakpoint keyword where a test is failing. This will open up a console at the breakpoint spot. Unfortunately it doesn’t work well inside of emacs because the ROutput buffer is read only (in fact, you’ll have to kill the process). So run the test from the command line when you want to play with breakpoints. I can’t seem to find a way to access the local variables in a method… so on to ruby-debug.

Debugging a Test – rdebug (or redbug according to Microsoft Word)

sudo gem install rdebug -y

in config/environments/test.rb

require 'ruby-debug'

Then use the debugger keyword instead of the breakpoint keyword where you want to stop. Don’t use it when you’re running tests from emacs because things will look weird.

Running Tests – Fixtures – Validating Fixtures

Here’s the fun bit: sometimes you break your fixtures. Not on purpose, to test bad data, but because your erb goes a little wrong, or because they’ve gotten out of date with your schema. Here’s a rake task that will let you do rake db:fixtures:validate

If you are using erb to generate your fixtures, you can also see how your fixture will roll out using:

erb test/fixtures/fixturename.yml

And while you’re at it, you probably want to validate your existing database against your models. Here’s a rake task that will let you do rake db:validate_models

Running Tests – Advanced – autotest (part of ZenTest)

There’s a plugin called autotest that will automatically run tests on any files that have changed. This is great because you can keep the console open in the background and it will immediately catch if you’ve saved a file with a typo! No need to go to the web browser, navigate to the changed page and hit refresh. In fact, using the web browser should be an afterthought… you should be able to create tests for any features.

sudo gem install ZenTest
rehash
autotest -rails

One gotcha: disable autotest if you’re manually running tests as well! You’ll end up creating duplicate records in the test database. The solution is: don’t manually run tests with rake at the same time as autotest.

Walkthrough of autotest: http://maintainable.com/articles/dry_up_testing_with_autotest

There’s a way to integrate autotest into emacs.

Running Tests – Advanced – RedGreen (for autotest)

Not the horrible Canadian TV show, but a notifier for autotest status reports.

https://wiki.csuchico.edu/confluence/display/webd/Testing+Rails+Apps

Running Tests – Advanced – ZenTest

ZenTest is useful for parsing your rail files and creating stubs of tests.

Running Tests – Advanced – Test::Rails (part of ZenTest)

Test::Rails provides a mechanism for splitting functional tests into controller tests and view tests. This decoupled lets you check your business logic as is, and your view routing as is.

If you want to add a generator for creating view/integration/controller tests:

./script/plugin install http://topfunky.net/svn/plugins/vic_tests

Some collected thoughts about Test::Rails

Running Tests – Advanced – Rcov

Rcov is another tool that will help your testing by calculating the code coverage of your tests. This is an essential tool to find holes in your testing strategy. All the usual caveats of code coverage apply.

http://eigenclass.org/hiki.rb?rcov

sudo gem install rcov
rehash
rcov test/path_to_specific_test.rb - or - ./script/plugin install http://svn.codahale.com/rails_rcov

Now you can do

rake test:units:rcov

http://agilewebdevelopment.com/plugins/rails_rcov

Running Tests – Advanced – Heckle

Heckle mutates your code to see if the tests actually check anything. Unfortunately highly coupled code is heckle-proof because changing anything breaks everything else.

sudo gem install heckle

Running Tests – Measuring – Flog

Flog measures reports a score based on how complex it thinks your code is. The higher the score, the higher the chance that there is a bug hiding there.

sudo gem install flog

A Handful of Blogs About Rails Testing

These guys have written a lot (all?) of the plugins I’ve mentioned and are worth checking out if this stuff interests you:

Related Posts

Getting Started With Ruby on Rails – Week 2

Posted in Ruby on Rails, Technology by engtech on November 28, 2007

Learning Ruby

I’ve fallen for the hype and started using Ruby on Rails for building database driven web applications. You can follow along with my weekly experience discovering gotchas with Ruby on Rails.

Previously: Getting Started With Ruby on Rails – Week 1

Emacs Rails-mode

Last week I complained about wasting time setting up rails-mode in emacs. I’m starting to find some real time saver though. The navigation short-cuts are absolutely necessary for navigating the file structure of a Rails application and I really like how the syntax highlighting can capture lines that don’t make any sense to Ruby. This is a great feature if you’re learning Ruby at the same time as you’re learning Rails. It has auto completion for “”, [], {} and ending function blocks and even picks up things like when you have one too many ends in your file.

Which files should be checked in?

I couldn’t find a list of what files are allowed to be checked in anywhere in Agile Web Development with Rails. The answer seems to be anything but:

db/schema.rb # easier to let your db:migrate control it
config/database.yml # because it contains database passwords
coverage/* # generated by rcov
logs/* # generated by server
tmp/* # temporary sessions files

Don’t overwrite the flash

Bad, no validation errors will be shown:

@model.save
flash.now[:notice] = "I saved it"

Better:

if (@model.save) then
flash.now[:notice] = "I saved it"
end

Will trap and display ruby errors as well as validation errors:

begin
if (@model.save) then
flash.now[:notice] = "I saved it"
else
  raise "Error saving"
end
# Do stuff
rescue Exception => e
  flash[:notice] = e.message
end

Keep controllers streamlined

I found myself creating one controller that had add/show/delete/list actions for multiple models. It’s much cleaner to have multiple controllers for the individual models.

Conditional Linking

link_to_if will put an unlinked version of the text if the conditional is false. This is much more useful than removing the link text completely for a lot of situations, because you don’t have to worry that the rest of the text around it will look weird. Don’t try to use html_options as a hash! I lost quite a bit of time to this because it won’t use the method parameter, but it doesn’t give you an error.

link_to_if (check_if_user_can_delete),
	"Delete Image",
	{ :action => "delete", :id => @image.id },
	:confirm => "Are you sure?",
	:class => "dangerous",
	:method => :delete

Generate validates_* off of database

I would have liked it if the generate script automatically generated validates_* helpers off of the database table. validates_length_of could be generated for :limit and validates_numericality_of could be generated for :integer.

Using the same partial to display create/edit/show

This is a neat little trick I found. You can use the same partial for your create/edit/show actions by using html_options and setting

{ :disabled => (controller.action_name == "show" ? true : false) }

for all the fields. It might not be useful for many public applications, but for an internal app it’s a great way to use the same ajaxy displays that you use for create/edit in show.

Polymorphic Associations

Are weird if you want to validate uniqueness. They might work better with has_many relationships than with has_one relationships. Or, I made it more complicated that it had to be.

Deploying sucks

It’s true. Played around a bit with capitrano and vlad the deployer but the both seem to assume you’re using subversion.

Free Tidbit: How crypt works in passwd files

I don’t know why this was so hard to find in Google: passwd files that use the crappy crypt mechanism use the first two characters of the expected password as the salt!

given_password = "hello_world"
encrypted_password = "ahga3sgj"
return encrypted_password == given_password.crypt(encrypted_password.slice(0,2))

and don’t worry, I’ll talk about something other than Rails later this week :)

Getting Started With Ruby on Rails – Week 1

Posted in Ruby on Rails, Technology by engtech on November 21, 2007

Learning Ruby

I’ve fallen for the hype and started using Ruby on Rails for building a database driven web application. If you’ve never heard of Rails it is a web framework using the Ruby programming language. Ruby is an object-oriented interpreted language, that’s often compared favourably with Smalltalk. [1] What’s a framework? A framework provides a structure and a set of tools usually for solving a particular type of problem. A programming language solves general problems while a framework extends a programming language to better solve a specific problem.

Rails is a framework for building web applications: stuff like blog software, instant messaging, to-do lists, web magazines, and your favorite web comic. Word on the street is that ROR is a resource hog but the resource consumption is balanced out by how much more productive it is to develop with. It’s easier to buy more computers to host a web application than it is to hire more developers. Computers get more powerful over time; developers not so much.

I’ve been developing websites as a hobby off and on since 1994, but I only learned CSS in the past six months. I’ve done some minor hacking of other people’s web apps that were written in ASP or Perl and they were always horrible messes of spaghetti code. I’m really looking forward to trying out a web app from scratch.

Choose Your Path

I run a Windows machine with a VMWare Linux box inside of it, so I can choose to do my Rails development under Windows or under Linux. If I use Windows then I can use InstantRails, which is a one-click installer that gives you everything to need to start coding ASAP. But I much prefer developing under Linux because you can’t beat the power of having a strong command line. The Windows command line console is a joke, and requires a ton of 3rd party utilities for stuff that’s already there under Linux. [2]

The downside is that there is no one-click install for Linux. Well, except for this one, which I didn’t notice until now :)

Installing ruby, gem and rails is simple and I was able to do it under my user account using the standard –prefix=/home/engtech install options.

Gotcha #1 – MySQL

I already had MySQL installed on my Linux box but it was an extremely old version that blew up the second I tried to use Rails to talk to the database. You need at least MySQL 4 to use Rails because it uses ENGINE=InnoDB for its calls. Older versions of MySQL don’t have InnoDB turned on by default, and once you do turn it on they only understand TYPE=InnoDB.

Mysql::Error: You have an error in your SQL syntax near 'ENGINE=InnoDB'

Tip: Get the latest and greatest version of MySQL instead of whatever came with your Linux install. I needed the Server, Client, and Developer RPMs. MySQL was the part of the install process that required root access.

Tip: If you use a password for your MySQL root account, make sure you change config/database.yml to use it.

Gotcha #2 – Integrated Development Environment (IDE)

Rails doesn’t come with a standard IDE, but instead gives you a wide option of choices. Aptana RadRails, based on Eclipse is a good choice. But I’ve already sold my soul to one editor for all my coding needs: emacs. Emacs is the “kitchen sink” IDE because it supports everything: you can find extensions for any programming language or task. The downside is that it has a learning curve like you wouldn’t believe.

There’s a tutorial on how to add rails support to emacs. It’s long and complicated. Using rails mode in emacs requires upgrading to emacs version 22 that broke a lot of my existing DotEmacs hacks. I eventually got it working, but in retrospect I might have been better off going with RadRails because I lost hours to this. I’m still finding emacs keystrokes that don’t do what I expected them to.

I’m unimpressed that there isn’t a quick reference print sheet for rails-mode, this is the best that I could find. So far I’ve only been using the syntax highlighting and C-c C-c g K and C-c Up / C-c Down to navigate between files.

Gotcha #3 – Development Server vs Production

When I was running into MySQL installation problems, I toyed with using SQLite3 instead for a while. Needless to say, make sure your development database is using the same versions of everything as your development and test servers. It’ll save you lots of headaches.

Initial Opinion

People weren’t lying about how productive programming with Ruby on Rails is. In the same amount of time it took me to write this blog post I was able to get a simple web application with user authentication up and running with a web interface that is probably “good enough” for final release. Which is ridiculous, compared to my previous experience hacking apps together using ASP or Perl.

  • Directory structure - Clean, clear, and everything has it’s place.
  • Naming conventions - One of the best things a framework can give is enforcing a standard way of naming things. It takes a while to learn it, but it becomes second nature that if a class is called X, the database table is called Y and the tests are called Z. If you leave it to themselves most developers create small inconsistencies in naming conventions that waste time — especially if more than one person is working on the code.
  • Don’t Repeat Yourself - I really like the way Model/View/Controller separates the code and keeps it becoming a mess. Inheritance and helpers/partials are great for keeping you from duplicating code.
  • Succinct - Wow, you really do get a lot done with very little code writing. They weren’t kidding when they said you could write blogging software in under 15 minutes.
  • HTML / CSS / XML – I really love that it doesn’t try to hide the HTML, CSS and XML under a lot of programming calls. There are helpers for doing common things, but you’re free to write your own web code.
  • Development / Test / Production - In my limited experience with web apps, I’ve never worked on anything that had more than 20 users. Testing was all done manually, and the production server was the development server. It was a mess. Clean separation makes it much easier to work on code independently and only push it out to users once it has been rigorously tested.
  • Migrations - We use to build our database tables using a PHPMyAdmin web interfaces. Needless to say, doing it through scripting where you can tear down, reassemble, and rebuild the database tables is much cleaner because everything is reproducible from scratch.
  • Rake, rdoc, and test - One of the things I like most about Ruby is that it has all the fixings I expect from modern languages: the ability to automatically generate documentation off of the code and a built-in unit testing and build framework. I’m always amazed when I see a language that doesn’t natively support these facilities.
  • Religion - The big downside to Ruby on Rails is that it feels a little bit like a religion sometimes.

Conclusion

I should have tried Ruby on Rails a long time ago. I spent entirely too much time setting up my development environment compared to when I could have been developing a web application. I could have been up and running in less than an hour if I had:

  1. Used InstantRails
  2. Used Aptana RadRails

Footnotes

1 – Did you know that Smalltalk inspired the Macintosh GUI? Smallpark was yet another example of the magic that was going on at XEROX PARC in the 70s. These are the guys who invented the mouse, colour graphic, windows/icons for a GUI, WYSIWYG text editors, Ethernet (how you talk to other computers on a network), and laser printers. Programmers at Work featured interviews with some of the people from PARC.

2 – I’m always amazed that people can program without easy access to diff, find, grep, perl, etc. All of these things are available for Windows for free, but they never work quite the way I expect them to.

Best of Feeds – 30 links – programming, google, tips, agile, facebook

Posted in Best of Feeds by engtech on October 20, 2007

RSS feeds are like cookies (that are good enough for me). Best of Feeds is a weekly collection of the best stuff I saw on the Internet this week. They’re saved on delicious and stumbleupon and cross-posted to Twitter and Tumblr as they happen and then collected together on Saturdays. I don’t blog on the weekend so read these links instead.Subscribe to //engtech to see this every week (or get it by email).

Legend

  • saves – number of people who bookmarked on http://del.icio.us
  • inbound links – number of blogs who linked to it (max 100)
  • diggs – number of people who dugg on http://digg.com

This Week at Internet Duct Tape

  • How I Use Google Reader
    • “How I Use” is a new series I’m starting about the software I use on a day-to-day basis. I want share tips and tricks and to learn tips and tricks from readers sharing with me in the comments. Google Reader is a web-based RSS reader. Because it’s web-based I can access my Google…
  • The Attention Age: Accelerando, Software Agents, Filters and Gatekeepers
    • Last night I finished reading Accelerando by Charles Stross. Like many of the books I read these days, I heard about it from another blogger. It feels like a spiritual sequel to Alvin Toffler’s Future Shock, John Brunner’s the Shockwave Rider and Warren Ellis’ Transmetropolitan. It is…
  • Blog Action Day: Save Paper when Readers Print Your Blog
    • Today is Blog Action Day with a focus on the environment and I’m going to teach a quick CSS trick for how to save paper by reducing what gets printed when someone prints an article from your blog.
  • Coworkers Considered Harmful
    • I hit a realization this weekend that I’ve hit many times before. There’s an inordinate number of times when I’m in the office late not because of my own time management failures but because of the people I work with.
  • Best of Feeds – 26 links – programming, webdesign, javascript, design, tips
    • Tags: blogging, design, fun, javascript, lifehacks, programming, rails, tips, usability, web2.0, webdesign, writing

This Week at IDT Labs

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Best of Feeds – 26 links – programming, webdesign, javascript, design, tips

Posted in Best of Feeds by engtech on October 14, 2007

RSS feeds are like cookies (that are good enough for me). Best of Feeds is a weekly collection of the best stuff I saw on the Internet this week. They’re saved on delicious and stumbleupon and cross-posted to Twitter and Tumblr as they happen and then collected together on Saturdays. I don’t blog on the weekend so read these links instead.Subscribe to //engtech to see this every week (or get it by email).

Legend

  • saves – number of people who bookmarked on http://del.icio.us
  • inbound links – number of blogs who linked to it (max 100)
  • diggs – number of people who dugg on http://digg.com

This Week at Internet Duct Tape

  • What I’m Playing: PC, Nintendo DS, Xbox 360
    • I’m on day 10 of “one of those weeks” so I haven’t had time to fully develop the usual cornucopia of rainbow-coloured blog post ideas. All of my time has been spent on work and family with a smidgen of video game playing to decompress my brain. This isn’t one of those…
  • The Holiday Spread – Group Weight Loss Game
    • This past weekend was Thanksgiving (aka Turkey Day) in Canada, which means seeing your family and eating a lot of food together. One of the favourite pastimes at any holiday is pointing out who’s gained weight and who hasn’t. This got me thinking: one of the principals of successful dieting…
  • Best of Feeds – 34 links – programming, google, lifehacks, ruby, funny
    • Tags: blogging, estimation, free, funny, google, gtd, javascript, lifehacks, productivity, programming, rails, ruby, rubyonrails, search, seo, tips

This Week at IDT Labs

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Best of Feeds – 34 links – programming, google, lifehacks, ruby, funny

Posted in Best of Feeds by engtech on October 07, 2007

RSS feeds are like cookies (that are good enough for me). Best of Feeds is a weekly collection of the best stuff I saw on the Internet this week. They’re saved on delicious and stumbleupon and cross-posted to Twitter and Tumblr as they happen and then collected together on Saturdays. I don’t blog on the weekend so read these links instead.Subscribe to Internet Duct Tape to see this every week (or get it by email).

Legend

  • saves – number of people who bookmarked on http://del.icio.us
  • inbound links – number of blogs who linked to it (max 100)
  • diggs – number of people who dugg on http://digg.com

This Week at Internet Duct Tape

  • Distraction Free GTD: 32 Todo List Web Applications
    • Web Runner is a tiny site-specific web application that runs using less resources than Firefox or Internet Explorer. The whole idea behind a site specific web browser is that you want to access a web application without being tempted to access other sites. You want to access a site without being…
  • Magazine Review: October 2007 Issue of Inc. Magazine
    • I came to a rather startling discovery in the past month: magazines are just blogs with the added luxury of being able to read them while on the toilet or in the bathtub (but hopefully not both). I picked up the October issue of Inc. magazine because Joel Spolsky of Joel On Software has joined the…
  • Blog Tip: Create a Link Post in 3 Seconds
    • One question I’m frequently asked is “how do you build those Best of Feeds weekly links?” The way I do it is pretty complicated, but I’ve found a much simpler way that I want to share with you all.
  • Digest for September 2007
    • Every month I publish a digest post collecting the best of Internet Duct Tape.
  • Best of Feeds – 30 links – programming, productivity, code, socialsoftware, socialnetworking
    • Tags: adsense, advice, blogging, career, code, design, development, firefox, gtd, lifehacks, productivity, programming, ruby, rubyonrails, socialnetworking, socialsoftware, tips, web2.0, webdesign

This Week at IDT Labs

  • [AKISMET] Akismet Auntie Spam v2.04
    • Our favorite Auntie has a new version. 2007/10/04 version 2.04 – Fixed (some) memory problems with v2.03 – Still slow, I need to get it working with a profiler, none of the hacks for Greasemonkey + Firebug seem to work.
  • [DELICIOUS] Delicious Link Builder
    • Build a list of links using your delicious account to bookmark them. Works great with my Yahoo Pipe Cleaner script . Example : [BOOKMARKING] toread – an email-based bookmark service Simple service to use to track stuff ‘to read later’. They store the top 10 for each day. It’s like…
  • [RSS PIPE] Stupid Credit Builder
    • This is a clone of Stupid Feed Rewriter that backdates the entry to January 1st, 1970. Useful for adding a credit link at the end of a list.

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Best of Feeds – 22 links – programming, blogging, tips, javascript, rails

Posted in Best of Feeds by engtech on September 23, 2007

RSS feeds are like cookies (that are good enough for me). Best of Feeds is a weekly collection of the best stuff I saw on the Internet this week. They’re saved on delicious and stumbleupon and cross-posted to Twitter and Tumblr as they happen and then collected together on Saturdays. I don’t blog on the weekend so read these links instead.

Subscribe to //engtech to see this every week (or get it by email).

Legend

  • saves – number of people who bookmarked on http://del.icio.us
  • inbound links – number of blogs who linked to it (max 100)
  • diggs – number of people who dugg on http://digg.com

This Week at Internet Duct Tape

  • 9 Techniques to Promoting Your Social Web Application

    How do you build a web app that has traction, gain users and hopefully explodes virally? I’ve been paying attention to this space for far too long and this is a round-up of the tricks and techniques successful and not-so-successful social web applications use to promote themselves.

  • The Problem With Social Web Applications

    This is an exciting time because unlike traditional software that runs on your computer [1], web applications are created as social software where you have a friends list, collaborate on a document with multiple people and it is easily to share information and communicate. The downside is these…

  • Best of Feeds – 55 links – programming, firefox, blogging, tips, lifehacks

    Tags: blogging, books, business, debugging, del.icio.us, delicious, development, digg, facebook, firefox, funny, games, geek, humor, life, lifehacks, management, organization, productivity, programming, security, smo, socialbookmarking, socialnetworking, socialsoftware, stumbleupon, tips, video

This Week at IDT Labs

  • [DELICIOUS/STUMBLEUPON] Delicious Stumbles crossposting tool

    Last Greasemonkey script this week :) With Delicious Stumbles I get all of the super-useful features I like about delicious (speed, recommended tags) but I also teach StumbleUpon more about what I like without having to spend all that time cutting-and-pasting between two accounts. Submit a page…

  • [WORDPRESS] Comment Ninja

    My WordPress Comment Ninja extension is available for beta test. Try it out and let me know what you think! Respond directly from the comment administration panel on your dashboard Respond by comment, email or both (without having to cut-and-paste your response!) Respond using your email…

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